Asp code validating a form orthodox dating guidelines

07-Aug-2015 19:30

To do this we’ll add a “using” statement for the “System. Data Annotations” namespace to the top of the file – and then decorate the Person properties with [Required], [String Length], [Range], and [Regular Expression] validation attributes (which are all implemented within that namespace): Note: Above we are explicitly specifying error messages as strings.Alternatively you can define them within resource files and optionally localize them depending on the language/culture of the incoming user.Specifically, let’s implement a “Create” form that enables a user to enter friend data: We want to ensure that the information entered is valid before saving it in a database – and display appropriate error messages if it isn’t: We want to enable this validation to occur on both the server and on the client (via Java Script).

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This is very important, since this code WILL be reached if the clientside validation is not used, for some reason.

You can learn more about how to localize validation error messages Now that we’ve added the validation attributes to our Person class, let’s re-run our application and see what happens when we enter bogus values and post them back to the server: Notice above how our application now has a decent error experience.

The text elements with the invalid input are highlighted in red, and the validation error messages we specified are displayed to the end user about them.

Notice below how it takes advantage of the new strongly-typed HTML helpers in ASP.

NET MVC 2 (enabling better intellisense and compile time checking support): And now when we run the application and hit the URL we’ll get a blank form that we can enter data into: Because we have not implemented any validation within the application, though, nothing prevents us from entering bogus input within the form and posting it to the server.

This is very important, since this code WILL be reached if the clientside validation is not used, for some reason.

You can learn more about how to localize validation error messages Now that we’ve added the validation attributes to our Person class, let’s re-run our application and see what happens when we enter bogus values and post them back to the server: Notice above how our application now has a decent error experience.

The text elements with the invalid input are highlighted in red, and the validation error messages we specified are displayed to the end user about them.

Notice below how it takes advantage of the new strongly-typed HTML helpers in ASP.

NET MVC 2 (enabling better intellisense and compile time checking support): And now when we run the application and hit the URL we’ll get a blank form that we can enter data into: Because we have not implemented any validation within the application, though, nothing prevents us from entering bogus input within the form and posting it to the server.

The Required Field Validator is actually very simple, and yet very useful.